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In the fall, 103 students from the “Braca Radic” Economic School in Đakovo, Croatia, visited the War Childhood Museum in Sarajevo. Accompanied by their teachers, this trip was a part of their research study focusing on the influences of South-East European cultural heritage on our region.

Natasa Santic, a teacher from the “Braca Radic” Economic School, had previously attended an international online seminar for teachers titled “Children and War.” The War Childhood Museum organized this seminar with the HERMES Foundation, the Youth Initiative for Human Rights (YIHR), and the Anne Frank Foundation, co-funded through Erasmus+ program. The seminar’s objective was to introduce educational approaches centered on themes of war and childhood, utilizing resources from the War Childhood Museum and the Anne Frank House. Inspired by the seminar, Professor Santic chose to incorporate our museum into her students’ research journey.

After their visit, the students returned to school with newfound insights. They engaged in discussions about childhood during wartime in their classrooms, with many penning reflections on their experiences at the War Childhood Museum and our permanent exhibition.

Below, we share some of their impressions.

“I really liked the museum because it teaches us about the difficult life situations that children of our age, and even younger, went through. I particularly enjoyed and found interesting the display of old packaging of various products. I recommend everyone to come and experience something like this! If I ever find myself in Sarajevo again, I will definitely visit the War Childhood Museum.” 😊- Korina Skrlin, 3. E1.

“The War Childhood Museum is one of the few museums that stirred my emotions. It’s hard to imagine that someone lived under such conditions. What touched me the most was a girl’s ‘graduation project,’ which was actually her last work. It’s horrifying to think, as I am a high school graduate myself that someone of that age wrote something for the last time.” – Marino Jukic, 4. E1.

“Visiting the War Childhood Museum in Sarajevo is a big plus in my book. The atmosphere and untold stories behind the items displayed in the museum evoke the wartime tranquility these people and children experienced during those challenging times. I wholeheartedly recommend a visit to anyone; the friendly and knowledgeable staff, the theme, and especially the authenticity make this museum a must-visit in Sarajevo.” – Domagoj Santic, 4. E2

“I really liked the War Childhood Museum precisely because its stories are not monotonous and based solely on sad tales. The museum contains long, sad, tragic, heroic, and joyful stories. It also showcases objects based on stories that give us additional motivation to understand what both the object and the person associated with it have been through.” – Tara Habada, 3. E1

“I like the War Childhood Museum because it’s not like all the other museums; it’s magical. When you enter the museum, you feel a sense of pain and sadness, but even when you see all those things, you feel the happiness that has disappeared.” – Kristina Birkic, 3. E1

“I never thought such a museum existed, nor that there was a war in Sarajevo. The museum is beautifully organized and carries an emotional story. I liked how they described the feelings and images of childhood during the war. It deeply moved me that these children experienced all of that in fear and couldn’t live freely. Conflicts should not happen! Solutions can be found for everything. Let’s not allow such a thing to happen again. Let’s not allow children to be deprived of the opportunity to live in happiness, peace, and play as they wish. Everyone has the right to that. Let’s create a safer future.” – Paulina Mikic, 2. E

“I never thought such a museum existed, nor that there was a war in Sarajevo. The museum is beautifully organized and carries an emotional story. I liked how they described the feelings and images of childhood during the war. It deeply moved me that these children experienced all of that in fear and couldn’t live freely. Conflicts should not happen! Solutions can be found for everything. Let’s not allow such a thing to happen again. Let’s not allow children to be deprived of the opportunity to live in happiness, peace, and play as they wish. Everyone has the right to that. Let’s create a safer future.” – Paulina Mikic, 2. E

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